The Evolution of the Nicer Slicer

Posted on January 15, 2013 by Sandford Schirmer | 0 Comments

As we’ve noted elsewhere, The Nicer Slicer is the evolution of an earlier kitchen tool. The original Slice-a-Slice was manufactured during the 1940's and 1950's in Duncannon, Pennsylvania by the Ace Manufacturing Company.

The fact that some families continue to use their antique slicers 60 years later is a testament to its usefulness. As times and tastes changed, many Slice-a-Slice tools were relegated to Grandma’s attic, and later to garage sales. As its popularity faded, so did the knowledge of how to effectively use the Slice-a-Slice. Blogs of old kitchen utensil collectors are full of questions and photos asking if anyone knows what its purpose was.

 

Many of my family members were still using their “mid-century modern” slicers  
in 2012 when I decided to see if I could improve the old tool and introduce it to several new generations. The rest, as they say, is history. We’ve had multiple orders for 5-6 Nicer Slicers from people who wanted to replace their extended families’ old Slice-a-Slice tools.

These people already know that slicering a piece of bread changes not just the thickness but also the texture, especially if the bread has been toasted first. A great example is a peanut butter and jelly sandwich made from one toasted and slicered piece of bread. The difference between the crunchy exterior and the soft interior is the set-up for the PB and J and it is a memorable, mouth watering improvement on the old standard.

There is more to say about bread, toast, and other things you can do with your Nicer Slicer. As our community grows we expect to share new discoveries of fun uses for this great tool. Who would ever have thought the venerable PB and J could be improved- but it is with the Nicer Slicer. Our mission is to introduce 21st century foodies to the joys of keeping our culinary tool on your respective kitchen counters.

Not the least among The Nicer Slicer’s virtues is the ability to cut calories. Twenty years ago the 3-inch bagel had 140 calories– today’s 6-inch bagel has 350. The US Centers for Disease Control warn, “Portion size influences how many calories a person consumes, and may hinder the ability of individuals to accurately assess how much they are eating.” Good information on portion control and weight management is available at the CDC website

We believe The Nicer Slicer can be a tool for weight management. Going back to the bagel example, you can toast a pre-sliced bagel half and then slicer it into 2 thin pieces,  cutting your breakfast calories from 350 to 175. (Re-toast the slicered bagel pieces,  add a little butter, a little jam, a good cup of coffee- now that IS living!)  Not to mention that you’ve just cut your food budget and have half a bagel for tomorrow! I want to eat food that tastes good, is fun to prepare and is in the right healthy proportion. That's why I believe the Nicer Slicer is an idea whose time has come (again). I encourage you to make your own snacks at home with this utensil. Once you see how it expands your food choices, reduces calories and can improve both taste and texture,­ it will change the way you think about your daily bread.

Sandy

Posted in bagels, kitchen tools, peanut butter and jelly sandwich, portion control, Slice-a-Slice


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